Review: BĒT Vodka – Vodka Made From Sugar Beets

BĒT Vodka
BĒT Vodka

Review: BĒT Vodka – Vodka Made From Sugar Beets

We’ve had some pretty cool vodkas come across our desk since we opened up shop in 2010, and every once in a while we get a genuine feeling of “wow, I can’t believe someone thought of that”. We’ve had crazy flavors like Froot Loop and Apple Jacks. I’ve had Black Vodka, ideally perfect for Halloween, I’ve had vodkas made from potatoes, fig, grapes, and corn. I’ve even had a vodka that was bottled after being personally poured of the naked body of a hot women. That one was a bit of an eye opener. Since then we haven’t seen anything that raised our eyebrow until we got an email from the folks over at BĒT vodka.

BĒT is a premium-pour vodka made from the hearts of sugar beets. My first mistake was reading it as B.E.T. vodka, like the television network. If you’re smarter than I am you already figured out its pronounced like the vegetable. Next I asked myself what can’t you make vodka out of? Turns out just about anything works, fruits, veggies, etc. Then I wondered what made them decide to go with Beets but if you think about it, it makes a lot of sense how this happens. In most countries the food and cuisines are based on the things that grow native to their surrounding. Alcohol is no different. We’ve all had vodkas from wheat and grain, it’s very common, but then there are grape vodkas from France, Potato vodkas from Idaho and Poland, rice vodkas out of Japan, and so on and so on. So, where is BĒT vodka made? Minnesota, which also happens to be the number one sugar beet-producing state in the country.


“The revelation of sugar beets as a viable agricultural commodity is highly attributed to the French — with roots dating back to the Napoleonic period. But it wasn’t until the late 19th century that a New Yorker named Henry Oxnard invented a “modern” way to process sugar beets in America’s Midwest. Fast forward a century and sometwo 21st-century pioneers — Ben Brueshoff and Jerad Poling — conceived a brilliant way to repurpose the hearts of sugar beets and create a premium vodka.”

First Impression: Great packaging. BĒT came to us packaged in a unique stubby bottle with a very simple and modern labeling. In this case, I love simple, especially in a time where it seems every day a new vodka hits the shelves with each bottle being more obnoxious and flashy than the last. Very modern, very upscale, and a nice touch overall to show the quality and detail that goes into their brand. I twisted open the cap and got a huge whiff of the vodka and I’d be lying if I said I notice much of a difference. It’s pretty neutral as you would expect from a vodka.

Tasting Notes: Although the aroma was neutral, once I took a sip, it was very clear this vodka isn’t like the others. It’s got a very distinct sweetness on each sip that then lingers and leaves an after taste, but that’s not a bad thing. Lori tried it and wasn’t a fan, I took a sip and then another, and then another, the sugary taste grew on me pretty quickly. After trying it at room temperature I had some on ice and even notices some vanilla in the taste. 

Price: $38.99 [750/ml]

Grade: B

Final Word: Vodka made from Beets, who knew? I’ve never actually even had a Beet before, so I’m glad this was my introduction. I think what I liked most about it was it was pleasant, flavorful, and boozy all at the same time, something you rarely can say about a vodka without smothering it in mixers and fresh fruit. The sugary taste followed by the after taste might not be for everyone, but let’s be honest with ourselves, most drinkers only “think” they can tell the difference between a good vodka and a crappy one. At 38.99 it’s a bit pricey but their process is unique and as it should come with an equally unique taste. At the very least it will be a great conversation starter at your next get together. For the reasons I’ve already stated this one gets a spot in my liquor cabinet for sure.

For more information on BĒT Vodka, including where to buy a bottle, visit them at www.betvodka.com or check them out on their Facebook page.

Cheers,
Alex



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